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Daily Greening

Ways to Green your Cleaning Routine at Home

 Keep your house clean without the toxic side-effects. Here are some methods to take note of!

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The Greener Way to Keep your Home Mold-Free

Molds are nature’s little helpers, and are considered part of the natural environment. However, you wouldn’t really want to share your home with them, as they tend to not only break down the things on which surfaces they grow on, they can also cause health problems. Most people employ harsh methods of removing mold and spores from inside their houses, but rather than using bleach or borax which could affect pets or the environment, there are other natural and eco-friendly ways to kill mold at home. 

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Asbestos and its Impact to the Environment

Previously a common component of a lot of construction materials and household products, asbestos continues to threaten both human health and the environment even decades after its use was discontinued.

Let’s take a look at this harmful substance and its impact to the environment.

 

What is Asbestos?... read more

A Greener Summer

No need to have the summertime blues this year -- let's have the summertime greens!  There are plenty of excellent ways to keep your summer KEEN and GREEN!  

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Companion Planting for Natural Gardens

Companion planting is basically just arranging your garden so that complementary plants are near each other. This can mean different things, including plants that deter pests, attract insects, or require different nutrients to reduce competition. Most gardeners will be planting a common assortment of vegetables, so we will try to focus mostly on those you’re likely to find in any garden.

Alfalfa

For starters, there are some plants that are pretty much good to plant near anything. Alfalfa is one of these. A drought-resistant crop, it has strong roots that help to break up soil and aerate it for others with weaker root systems. Its tap root also deposits nitrogen into the soil, reducing your need for fertilizer and making the soil richer for the next planting year.... read more

Go Green for the Patio Season

With the warm weather returning, you may be starting to plan for your backyard and deck area.   Making choices outside your home that support your commitment to sustainable living is getting easier, with many new recycled product introductions.  Non-renewable resources such as non-recycled plastics that create harmful emissions during manufacturing can be completel... read more

Running a Basically Self-Sufficient Home

Homesteading: a lifestyle of self-sufficiency.... read more

Green Tips for Cleaning Upholstery

cleaning upholsteryNo matter how clean you keep your home, sofas and leather chairs eventually get dirty. Whether your upholstery needs cleaning because of a spill, stain or dirt, using the right cleaning method is important. 

Many of today’s commercial products are loaded with harsh chemicals and can be very expensive. So instead of buying these agents from the grocery, it’s better to create your own.... read more

The Downside of Ice Melt

This blog post was originally published on Keen For Green in February 2011, but it's such useful information that we like to repost it every winter.

http://www.analogphotography.comI don't know about the rest of you, but I can tell you that we in the Midwest have had the snowiest, iciest, coldest winter in decades, and it's really gotten me thinking. Since I became a dog mom in January of 2002 I've heard that ice melt is bad for dogs. This has led me to always keep a mat at my front door and religiously take off my shoes the moment I enter the house. I've also stopped using any ice melting product in the back yard, my dog's domain. But is there any truth to this ice melt rumor? If so, what exactly can ice melt to do a dog? 

According to the ASPCA, it is the sodium chloride and calcium chloride in the most common ice melts that is potentially damaging to the puppy in your life. If your dog walks on an ice melt containing one of these chemicals, her paws can become dry and cracked. And if she licks her paws or eats the ice melt (the ASPCA cautions that she can also ingest it by drinking from a puddle of melted snow containing ice melt), her problems can get worse. The ASPCA lists symptoms from as mild as excessive drooling and loss of appetite to as severe as decreased muscle function, coma, and death. ... read more

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