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Preventing Pollution

Safety Trainings: Why are they necessary?

Safety Trainings: Why are they necessary?

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Asbestos and its Impact to the Environment

Previously a common component of a lot of construction materials and household products, asbestos continues to threaten both human health and the environment even decades after its use was discontinued.

Let’s take a look at this harmful substance and its impact to the environment.

 

What is Asbestos?... read more

Green Camping Tips

green camping

Are you camping this summer?  Here are some tips for keeping your camping trip keen and green:... read more

4 Ways to Improve Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air can be more polluted than the air you breathe outside. Shocking, but true. And it isn’t just because you keep your windows open at night, thereby allowing the pollutants in outdoor air to waft into your house. Chemicals commonly found in each households, such as floor cleaners and insecticides also add to the growing list of pollutants that are making your indoor air quality bad.

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The Lowdown on Asbestos in the Workplace

Asbestos has been banned from use since 1990 due to the many health risks that it was discovered to cause. However, it is still a dangerous substance that yet exists in a number of old yet still utilized homes and buildings today. While it is no longer an active ingredient in household and construction products, the risk for exposure to this harmful substance still exists not only in homes, but also in workplaces.

 

But what exactly do we need to know about asbestos in the workplace?

 

1. History of use

 

Asbestos was widely used in a lot of construction and household products a few decades back – and with good reason. Asbestos fibers are strong and durable, and proven to be resistant to heat and fire, making them good substances for many a building products. It’s a fact well demonstrated by the presence of asbestos in many homes and buildings that were built between the 1950’s to the late 1980’s.... read more

Everything You Need to Know About Indoor Air Pollution

Humans breathe in an average of 3,000 gallons of air each day, and spend about 90% of their time indoors. But did you know that indoor air can be up to 5 times more polluted than outdoor air?

 

 

Those fumes from insect sprays, cleaning agents, beauty products, and even from the food being cooked in the kitchen all contribute to indoor air that could add up to an alarming amount of pollutants.

 

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5 Ways to Save Green by Going Green

Non-renewable energy comes at a price. The more of it you use, the more you’re going to pay. In the same way, our consumption of these energy resources comes at a price to our local, regional and global ecosystem – and its cost might be higher than we were ever willing to pay.

Unfortunately, there seems to be a commonly held misconception that it’s infeasible to offset our individual costs and those on the environment. Well, I’m here to tell you that this it’s totally feasible, and anybody can save green by going green.

You just have to do a little bit of homework before you get started.

Research, Research and More Research

What you’re trying to accomplish is a systemic switch in which type of energy you use, and how much you’ll be consuming. This is going to be a great deal more extensive than just changing out lightbulbs, so it’s going to require a good bit of research on your part.

Here are just a few questions you’ll want to ask yourself to give you a starting point:

  • Where do you live? You need to determine your region’s climate and how your energy is commonly supplied in your local area.
  • What is your living situation like? Do you rent or own? What are you currently using for energy utilities?
  • What is your current budget for the project? Think of this switch as more of an investment than an overhead cost.
  • What can you do (rather what do you want to do)? Some changes might not be possible, given your living situation, due to space or legal issues.

 

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Are Biodegradable Bags Really Biodegradable?

plastic bagOver the past few years, I've wound up with an occasional green "biodegradable" plastic bag, usually when taking home leftovers from a restaurant.    But are they actually biodegradable?  

As it turns out, no.  Alas, it's more greenwashing.  

Last month, the FTC sent warning letters to 15 additional marketers, informing them that their claims might be deceptive.   The FTC requested “competent and reliable scientific evidence proving that their bags will biodegrade as advertised."  The companies that manufacture these bags call them "oxo-degradable," meaning they supposedly break down after being exposed to oxygen for a while.  But the FTC isn't buying it and neither is Joseph Greene, the department chair and professor in the department of mechanical and mechatronic engineering and sustainable manufacturing at California State University, Chico.... read more

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