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Water

3 Summertime Water Saving Tips

Much of the country needs more water right now.  Everyone knows about the California drought, but other spots of the US are in need of water as well.  Even where I live in Massachusetts is "abnormally dry" and spots are in a moderate drought.  

Most people know the basic tips - turn the water off while you brush your teeth, don't over-water your lawn, etc.  But here are 3 equally easy tips that you may not have considered.  ... read more

Go Green for the Patio Season

With the warm weather returning, you may be starting to plan for your backyard and deck area.   Making choices outside your home that support your commitment to sustainable living is getting easier, with many new recycled product introductions.  Non-renewable resources such as non-recycled plastics that create harmful emissions during manufacturing can be completel... read more

Rain Harvesting Quick Facts

watering garden

As I write this blog post, I'm hunkered down at a coffee shop next to a window, watching the April Showers come down.  While the rain will help those tulips bloom, there is even a better way to make use of the rain.  Collect it and reuse it!

Here are some rain harvesting quick facts:... read more

Flushable Wipes Bad for the Sewers

flushable wipesPre-moistened "flushable" wipes have increased in popularity over the past few years.  They're convenient and easy, but unfortunately, they don't break down as claimed.  London has been seeing some serious problems with their sewer system as a result of these flushable wipes.  

“The baby wipes and the so-called flushable wipes — that we say are never flushable — help bind [the fats] together, like bricks and mortar, and eventually what you end up with is a large mass of fat that is rock hard. It goes hard like chalk. And once its in there its hard to get it out," explains Craig Rance of Thames Water,the company managing the public water supply in the London area. A 15-ton "fatberg" in Kingston, a London suburb, required Thames Water to dig up the roads for six months to remedy the problem.... read more

Springtime Tips for Conserving Water

rain conservationWelcome, springtime!  Our days in New England have yet to warm up, but I know that the warmer weather will be right around the corner.  Soon, my days will be filled with watering our garden, filling up the kiddie pool, and collecting raindrops in our rain barrell.... read more

How to Green Your Pool

In recent years, at-home pools have gained popularity; they’ve become more affordable and accessible than ever before and have presented a direct solution for those looking for ways to naturally improve their fitness, rehab certain injuries or treat certain conditions (and, of course, to just have good ol’ fun with friends and family).... read more

RECYCLE IT! Recycling Tip of the Week #3 - Recycling Your Water

dripping tapA lot of us focus on recycling things like cans and newspaper, but recycling can go beyond that.  How about recycling water?

There are a few ways to recycle water. 

1)  Harvest your rain.  Collect rainwater and use it to water your garden or wash your car.

2)  Collect shower water.  Keep a bucket in your bathroom so you can collect water as your shower water warms up.  If you use biodegradable bath and hair products, you could even use the rest of your bathwater!  ... read more

What Devices are Best for Saving Water in your Home

 

saving water

 

When looking around the house for ways to go even greener than before, looking at how to save water is often a great choice or route to go down. Not only is it an excellent way to help save on the growing demand we have for h20, but you can save money on home bills. Most solutions for saving water are actually surprisingly cheap, and as more and more water suppliers and plumbing companies are brought around to a green frame of mind, it is you who sees the benefits.

There are loads of freebies and cheap gizmos you can pick up to help save water from both taps and toilets, and, for those looking to make a massive difference, a few more expensive but comprehensive options. Sometimes it’s the little things that make the difference, but the big ones can’t hurt either. Here we’ll be looking at some of the best water saving devices you can install in your home. ... read more

Water Quality Testing 101

As a first world nation, it’s easy to take water quality for granted. While it’s true that the EPA has strict regulations for public drinking water, that doesn’t mean that all sources of water are equally safe.

Safety and Quality Concerns

If you rely on privately sourced water — like well water — it is your responsibility to test and manage the water quality. Dirty or contaminated water is cause for great concern, as common contaminants like fecal bacteria, pesticides, mercury, lead, nitrates, and other chemicals and organisms can cause serious illness.

However, even if you rely on quality-regulated public water, there are milder quality issues that you may wish to investigate. Comparatively minor issues like hard water, water with slight impurity concerns that result in stained fabric, or water with a slightly distasteful flavor are all hazards that may prompt you to test your water.

Getting the hard facts — through testing — about your water’s quality can help you choose the best course of action for resolving any issues you may face.... read more

Rainwater Harvesting - What's it All About?

Many of us are looking for ways to go about our lives in a more eco-friendly manner. Rainwater harvesting is one strategy you can employ. 

Here, we’ll discuss the what, the why, and the how on rainwater harvesting—what it is, why you might want to do it, and how to go about doing it.

 Harvesting rainwater

Consider how much water we underutilize when it rains!

What is rainwater harvesting? Harvesting rainwater is the act of using one of several methods to collect and reuse rainwater prior to its hitting the aquifer, where water is often extracted for well use. It helps to reduce the strain on local water systems and can actually help provide cleaner water to those consuming or utilizing it than that which has run through the soil and absorbed the chemicals and minerals therein. 

Why do it?  There are many uses for harvested rainwater. Some people use it for drinking water and other domestic uses like cleaning and bathing. Many people use it to water their lawns and gardens, and some farmers use it to save money on providing water to livestock.

Not only can this be a smart financial move, but it also happens to be good for the environment because it places less pressure on the water distribution system, particularly in times when there are water shortages. ... read more

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